Theft Crimes in Nevada

Theft crimes in Nevada are classified under Crimes Against the Person, or Crimes Against Property, and most of these crimes can be found in Nevada Revised Statutes Chapters 200 and 205. A summary of the most common theft crimes follows:

Petit Larceny (NRS 205.240)
Petit Larceny is defined as intentionally taking money or property that isn’t yours without the owner’s permission, valued at less than $650. The court, based on invoices of taken property, documented replacement value, or testimony of experts, determines value of property taken.

Petit Larceny is classified as a misdemeanor with jail time of up to six months, and/or fines up to $1,000. If convicted, you may be allowed to have the record sealed after one year.

Grand Larceny (NRS 205.220)
Grand Larceny is defined the same as Petit Larceny with the exception that the property taken is valued at greater than $650. The court, based on invoices of taken property, documented replacement value, or testimony of experts, determines value of property taken.

Grand Larceny is always classified as a felony, however, if convicted of taking property valued from $650 – $3,500, it is a Category C felony; requires restitution; and carries punishments of one to five years in state prison; and/or up to $10,000 in fines.

If the property taken is valued at more than $3,500, it is a Category B felony and requires restitution; and carries punishments of one to 10 years in State Prison; and/or up to $10,000 in fines.

Grand Larceny can be charged as a standalone offense or in addition to other offenses such as Car Theft, or Burglary. If convicted, you may be allowed to have the record sealed after five years.

Shoplifting (NRS 205.220 and NRS 205.240)
Shoplifting is called Larceny and is covered under the Petit and Grand Larceny statutes.

Stealing from an ATM (NRS 205.220)
Any use of a card or other device for the purpose of intentionally withdrawing funds from an ATM that you are not entitled to is classified as Grand Larceny regardless of the amount and is covered under the Grand Larceny statutes.

Burglary (NRS 205.060)
See our previous discussion of Burglary for a full explanation of this crime. Burglary is the intentional act of entering a building or vehicle with intent to commit petit or grand larceny; assault or battery or a felony on anyone in the building or vehicle; or obtaining money or property by false pretenses. Burglary can be charged whether theft or assault took place if it can be proved this was the intent of entering the premises.

Burglary is a Category B felony, and a first offense when not in possession of a firearm, carries a punishment of one to 10 years in state prison; and possibly or a fine of up to $10,000. First offense when in possession of a firearm carries a punishment of two to 15 years in State Prison; and possibly a fine of up to $10,000.

Shoplifting of less than $650 during the normal operating hours of a business will not subject you to the additional charge of Burglary, unless you have been previously convicted of petit larceny two previous times in a seven-year period or have been convicted of a felony.

If convicted of burglary, you may be allowed to have the record sealed after five years if the building was a non-residence, and after 10 years if it was a residence.

Robbery (200.380)
Robbery is classified as a crime against a person, and is defined as, “…the unlawful taking of personal property from the person of another, or in the person’s presence, against his or her will, by means of force or violence or fear of injury…”

It is classified as a Category B felony and is punishable by two to 15 years in State Prison.

If convicted of Robbery, you may be allowed to have the record sealed after 10 years.

Pickpocketing (205.270)
As opposed to Robbery, pickpocketing is the taking of property from the person of another without their knowledge or consent. No force or violence is involved.

However, pickpocketing is a felony. If the amount taken was less than $3,500 it is a Category C felony, requiring restitution, and carrying punishments of one to five years in State Prison, and possibly a fine up to $10,000.

If the amount taken was greater than $3,500, it is a Category B felony, requiring restitution, and carrying punishments of one to 10 years in State Prison and possibly a fine up to $10,000.

If convicted of pickpocketing, you may be allowed to have the record sealed after five years.

Possession of Stolen Property (NRS 205.275)
Possession of stolen property can subject you to the same penalties as Petit and Grand Larceny, depending on the value of the property, if you knew or should have known that the property was stolen, even if you didn’t steal the property, and even if the person who stole the property has not been prosecuted or convicted.

A possession of stolen property conviction is considered a misdemeanor if the value of the property is less than $650; a Category C felony if the value is between $650 and $3,500; and a Category B felony, if valued at over $3,500, or if it is a firearm.

Car Theft (NRS 205.228)
Car Theft is always considered Grand Larceny. Grand Larceny of a motor vehicle takes place when, “A person…intentionally steals, takes and carries away, drives away or otherwise removes a motor vehicle owned by another person…”

If the vehicle is valued at less than $3,500, it is considered a Category C felony, requires restitution, and carries a punishment of one to five years in State Prison and possibly a fine up to $10,000.

If the vehicle is valued at greater than $3,500 it is considered a Category B felony, requires restitution, and carries a punishment of one to 10 years in State Prison and possibly a fine up to $10,000.

The Defenders will provide a vigorous defense against Theft Charges

If you’ve been charged with a theft crime in Nevada, you are subject to severe penalties and fines. Additionally, employers are reasonably hesitant to hire a person who shows such a crime on a background check. If you’ve been charged with one of these crimes, you should seek representation by an attorney who will aggressively defend your rights. The Defenders knows this area of the law and under the direction of lead attorney Ryan Helmick of The Defenders will defend your rights under the law.

Call our office today to discuss your case at (702) 333-3333.

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